Ukraine has predicted the death of shipbuilding due to the purchase of Turkish corvettes

Kiev spent a huge amount of budget funds for the purchase of “senseless” Turkish corvettes ADA class and thus put the Ukrainian shipbuilding industry on the brink of extinction. Strana.ua wrote about it on 9 September.

The author of the article Yuriy Kasyanov noted that the price of 8 billion hryvnias for the ship can be compared to the state defence order of Ukraine for a whole year. At the same time, he expressed confidence that in the event of a clash with the Russian fleet, there would be no benefit from the Turkish corvettes.

“This entire multi-billion-dollar Turkish flotilla will either not go to sea at all in the event of war, or will be heroically sunk by the crews themselves. And this is in the best case,” said Kasyanov.

The journalist also pointed out that the Armed Forces of Ukraine (AFU) at the moment are much more in need of other types of weapons, such as air defense systems, armored vehicles and thermal imagers, but the state instead buys expensive corvettes, thus literally destroying domestic shipbuilding.

In conclusion the observer voiced the “slogan of the day” of the Kiev authorities: “We have killed the drone industry with Turkish drones – we will kill the shipbuilding industry with Turkish ships”.

On Tuesday, September 7, a ceremony of keel laying of the first of two ordered ADA class corvettes for the Ukrainian Navy took place in Turkey. According to the contract the ship will be handed over to Kiev in 2022 to join the Ukrainian Navy in 2024.

At the end of July it was reported that Kiev expects to receive the first ADA-class corvette in 2023. Defense Minister Andriy Taran said that an agreement had been reached with the Turkish side that the hull of the first corvette would be built in Turkey, while Ukraine would retain its equipment.

Earlier, on 4 August, it became known that Great Britain would transfer two decommissioned mine-resistant ships to Ukraine. It was about the Sundown-class mine-protection ships, which had completed more than 20 years of service in the Royal Navy.